Monthly mail • February 2020

Welcome to the first edition of The Kidlit Collective - a celebration of children's books and more

The Reluctant Reader

Booksloth rather than bookworm?

Here's how to encourage children to up their reading in 2021

MAGAZINES Okay, so a Fortnite magazine is no literary gem, but it does have words. And if it gets a book-o-phobe reading, then that should be considered a bit of a win.
If you are looking for something that is a little more insightful and inspirational for girls than the usual glossy line-up, check out @Kazoo. Aimed at five to twelve-year-olds, this sixty-four-page, ad-free magazine includes science, art, comics, games, crafts, stories, and recipes.
Before her death, Supreme Court juror Ruth Bader Ginsburg was among the magazine’s acclaimed experts. And if it was good enough for Ruth (a pioneer and advocate of women’s rights), we suspect it’s good enough for your daughters.

DO AS I DO (NOT JUST AS I SAY) Perhaps you have visions of your child snuggled on a bean bag, reading Great Expectations. Yet the last time you actually read a book, yourself, was Marian Keyes pool-side in Lanzarote, circa Corona (when holidaying was something we all did)?

Remember, children follow by example, so showing a personal interest in books, or as a family, could be helpful.

PODCASTS AND AUDIOBOOKS Sound like a bit of a cop-out? It really isn’t.
Simply listening to books can help children’s understanding of language and aid their development. What’s more, there’s a vast catalogue available online; whether it be classics, or the very latest book releases.
You’ll find David Tennant lending his voice to How to Train
Your Dragon, while Stephen Fry’s iconic vocals can be heard on Paddington Bear, and the Harry Potter series. Even Hollywood star Kate Winslet sprinkles some sparkly A-lister dust over the audio version of Roald Dahl’s Matilda.

ASK QUESTIONS Try and encourage your child to discuss a book, or indeed answer age-appropriate questions. Go for the open-ended that have no ‘correct’ answer. Who is your favorite character? Which part was the funniest? What do you think could happen next? That kind of thing.

FROM PRINT TO SCREEN Pretty much EVERYONE loves movies. Therefore, why not read the book then watch it on-screen. Compare the differences between the two in terms of storyline and characters, You could even ask your child to describe (or draw)  how the book’s characters appear in their mind before the movie starts.
Of course,  the number of children’s books-turned-movies is enormous. Peter  Rabbit,  Cat in the  Hat,  Eloise,  Curious  George, Madeline, Paddington Bear, Alice in  Wonderland,  The  Book  Thief,  Charlotte’s Web, the chronicles of  Narnia, Diary of a  Wimpy  Kid, the Harry  Potter series.
The list goes on and on, and on, and on…

For more reading tips for all ages, head over to the Booktrust
https://www.booktrust.org.uk/books-and-reading/tips-and-advice/reading-tips/

INSTA-WORTHY

Each month, we share some
extremely 'likeable' online
illustrative work that caught our
scrolling eye...

Coupling beautiful digital artwork with species info and conservation facts, Creecha Kids illustrator, Kyle Cody, took inspiration from his four-year-old daughter’s keen interest of non-fiction animal books in creating his bold wildlife imagery.
“It is truly one of her favourite things,” he explains. “So I started drawing animals for her and then decided I would combine our hours and hours of animal reading with the illustrations.”

The NYC-based Australian does this by simplifying each shape so that it could be cut from paper, before digitally painting over each piece to give texture, colour and lighting.

”I believe that the more children know about animals, the more they want to protect them and their habitats,’ Kyle says of his motivation. “So I really want to contribute to animal conservation in my own way and help spread awareness, but also the amazing world of creatures.”
The talented illustrator has a book planned for the end of the year. In the meantime, check out his designs @creechakids
What’s more, if you go to his bio, you can download The Penguins International Activity Workbook – a twelve-page workbook, where you can search for banded penguins around the world, identity adaptations, create your own trophic (food energy progression) pyramid and see how you can be part of the team to save the species.
Ideal for encouraging mini Attenboroughs!

THE BOOK CLUB

Following on from Charlie Changes into a Chicken, and Charlie Turns into a T-Rex, the third instalment in this popular, laugh-out-loud book series launches this month.
Charlie McGuffin has the peculiar ability to change into animals when he gets nervous. And although, by book three he has learnt how to harness his ‘superpower’, life isn’t always plain-sailing.
While a pet-napping mystery engulfs the town (which Charlie fears he may somehow be connected to), the young boy also has to deal with his worries over his bickering parents.
Author Sam Copeland cleverly weaves comedy into a story that helps children understand and deal with emotions.


Charlie Morphs into a Mammoth
Out this month, February, 2021. Image courtesy of Puffin Books.

QUOTABLE QUOTES

WORDS BIG ENOUGH

TO CHANGE THE WORLD

" THE MORE THAT YOU READ ,
THE MORE TINGS THAT YOU WILL KNOW .
THE MORE THAT YOU LEARN ,
THE MORE PLACES YOU'LL GO . “

DR SEUSS, I CAN READ WITH MY EYES SHUT